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Phoenix City Council Votes For Slower Speed Limits On Several Streets In The Valley

By on December 7, 2023 0 77Views

On Wednesday, the Phoenix City Council passed a law that will reduce the speed limit on a dozen streets within the city.

The Phoenix City Council voted unanimously to reduce the speed limit on multiple streets in the city to 5 miles per hour slower than it had been.

Drivers in those specific areas will be required to reduce their speed soon.

The Phoenix City Council voted in favor of reducing the speed limit on 12 streets in the city. Following an assessment of the area’s roads, officials proposed the speed limit alteration as a way to improve safety.

The following places are where the speed limit shall be reduced:

Ahwatukee

  • Central Avenue from Liberty Lane to Chandler Boulevard (35 to 30 mph)
  • Liberty Lane from 17th Avenue to Central Avenue (35 to 30 mph)

Biltmore

  • Lincoln Drive from Ocotillo Road to 32nd Street (45 to 40 mph)
  • 24th Street from Lincoln Drive to Montebello Avenue (45 to 40 mph)
  • 32nd Street from the Arizona Canal to Lincoln Drive (45 to 40 mph)

Central Phoenix

  • Osborn Road from 19th Avenue to 7th Avenue (35 to 30 mph)

Laveen

  • 43rd Avenue from Dobbins Road to Olney Avenue (35 to 30 mph)
  • 19th Avenue from Dobbins Road to Southern Avenue (45 to 40 mph)

East Phoenix 

  • McDowell Road from 52nd Street to Galvin Parkway (50 to 45 mph)

North Phoenix

  • Hatcher Road from 19th Avenue to Central Avenue (35 to 30 mph)
  • 12th Street from Mountain View Road to Indian School Road (35 to 30 mph)

South Phoenix

  • 24th Street from South Mountain Road to Baseline Road (35 to 30 mph)

The council took in to consideration that these roads “turn into a highway during certain times of the day” with drivers regularly going faster than the posted speed limit.

At the meeting before the council vote, there was a hope that the reduction would bring about safer streets. Nevertheless, it was felt that people would still drive at excessive speeds and the reduction would not be effective.

Council members emphasized that the decision would not lead to an increase in patrols or the installation of speed cameras in the areas.